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NASW member studying two sets of twins separated at birth

Photo of the twins courtesy of the New York Times Magazine.

Photo of the twins courtesy of the New York Times Magazine.

Due to a hospital error, two sets of identical twins in Columbia were mixed up. The two pairs of children grew up in two different households believing they were fraternal, not identical twins.

In fact, one of each set of twins grew up in a household among people they were not related to.

That is until 24 years later when a chance encounter at a butcher shop uncovered the hospital mistake and the brothers discovered they were not who they thought they were.

The strange case of Jorge Enrique Bernal, Carlos Alberto Bernal Castro, William Canas Velasco and Wilber Canas Velasco is detailed in this New York Times Magazine article.

National Association of Social Workers member Yesika Montoya, MSW, a lecturer at the Columbia School of Social Work in New York City, has teamed up with Nancy Segal, a professor at California State University, to study the twins. Montoya is a psychologist in her native Colombia where the two sets of twins live.

How much are identical twins Carlos and Wilber and Jorge and William alike or different and how much did genetics, environment or upbringing affect their makeup?

The article also said Montoya tried to get the twins to express the feelings they are experiencing after discovering they have an identical twin  they had never met.

Social workers help people overcome stress and challenges. To learn more visit the National Association of Social Workers’ Help Starts Here Mind and Spirit website.

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